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3 Indian Fry Bread Recipes (Bannock)

3 Indian Fry Bread Recipes (Bannock)

3 Indian Fry Bread Recipes (Bannock)

Photos: Calmingwind and KeyIngrediant

Bannock is the one of the preferred survival foods of the first mountain men settling the wild west. Not only did it provide them with the carbs needed for the tenuous trek of the day ahead but it was quick and easy to make in most cases over an open fire.

It is also commonly known as Indian fry bread and each tribe had it’s own unique recipe and method of cooking it. Depending on what you have left in your stores you can make one or another of these native recipes to carry you through.

Find below my personal favorites

Ojibwe zaasakokwaan (Native American fried bread)

Ojibwe zaasakokwaan (Native American fried bread) often used as or like a taco shell

Ingredients

1+½ cups flour
2 tsp. sugar
½ tsp. salt
3 tsp. baking powder (or 1 tsp. baking soda and 2 tsp. cream of tartar)
1 egg
½ cup warm milk
½ cup flour for kneading

Enough cooking oil to be ½ in. deep in whatever sized skillet you are using to fry the bread.

Directions
Heat your electric skillet to 400 and fill with vegetable oil 1/2″ deep. A deep fryer might also be used.

Mix dry ingredients together well in a medium sized bowl. Beat egg separately and add to dry ingredients. Heat milk for 45 sec to a minute in the microwave and add slowly to the mixture.

Begin kneading in the bowl and once it seems a little more uniform, turn it out onto your “flour’d” kneading surface and knead for a minute or two.

Role the dough out until it is (ideally) 1/2 an inch thick.

Once the dough is a uniform thickness, cut it into 2″ wide strips. A pizza cutter would be perfect for this.

Next cut a slice through the middle of each piece of dough. Leaving the ends intact.

You are then ready to fry your bread! Place them in the oil carefully, and let them brown for a minute or two before turning and doing the same to the other side.

Remove from the oil and let drain on a paper towel laden platter.

Calming Wind’s bannock (Muskogee Creek Native American sour fry bread)

Calming Wind’s bannock (Muskogee Creek Native American sour fry bread)

Ingredients

½ teaspoon baking powder
¼ teaspoon salt
¼ cup sugar
2 cups white flour self-rising
½ teaspoon vanilla
1 16oz. sour cream

water – as needed to make dough

Powdered sugar or jam for topping
Directions
Mix together all dry ingredients.
Add sour cream to the dry ingredients.
Add enough water to make a dough.
Let rise about 1/2 hr.
Pull off pieces of dough.
Roll in flour, make a ball and then flatten.
Fry in oil until golden

Native American Sweet Fry Bread

Native American Sweet Fry Bread

This traditional fry bread can be made into either a sweet or savory dish, depending on what you put on it. Serve it with chili, or top with powdered sugar and jam.

Ingredients
2¼  teaspoons yeast
⅛ cup sugar
¼ teaspoon salt
½ cup warm water
¾ teaspoons salt
¼ cup sugar
½ cup butter, softened
1 cups warm water
4 cups flour (set aside ½ cup)
Directions
Mix ingredients 1-4 in a large bowl; then let “sponge” for 15 minutes or so until foamy.

Mix remaining dry ingredients in another bowl, and alternate adding dry stuff and water to the first mixture, allowing mixer to work ingredients before adding more.

WARNING: You may need the extra 1/2 cup of flour–the dough should NOT be sticky when finished.

Knead the dough, working in the remaining flour as you knead.

Grease a large glass or plastic bowl; shape dough into a large ball, place in bowl–turning to grease all sides; cover loosely with plastic

and place in a warm place; let rise until doubled.

Heat about a half-inch of oil in a large frying pan (375°F to 400°F).

While the oil heats, remove dough from bowl and divide into 4 balls. Each ball will make one dozen (12) balls (so a total of 48 balls).

Flatten each small ball into a thin disk (about 4 inches), make a little hole in the center of each. Keep a uniform shape, but these don’t have to look “perfect.”.

Carefully drop into hot oil; fry until bottom is golden brown, flip with a spatula in one hand and a fork in the other to prevent oil from splashing out.

Each Recipe has its own unique flavor and you might find that you enjoy one with savory dishes and another with sweet, try them all and find your favorite! Enjoy!

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